What Can I Give My Dog for Pain?

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what give dog for painEvery living organism experiences pain. Unfortunately, unlike humans, animals and other creatures cannot verbally express their pain enough to be understood by others. Some would call it instinct while others would call the ability to discern true pain from mere discomfort as something that has spiritual connection. Some believe that a mother knows when her child is in pain, as if there is an invisible connection between the two. Unfortunately, identifying a pet in pain is somewhat more difficult simply because humans are not naturally programmed to automatically connect with members of the animal kingdom, although humans are members of Kingdom Animalia. Nonetheless, as responsible pet owners, especially dog owners, one of the most frequently asked questions about pain is how to alleviate the pain experience of their pet dogs.

It is very unfortunate that the pain medications you take when you have a headache will simply not work for your dog. Although some say that it does work, the risks are high that your dog might suffer from the many side effects of these human pain relievers simply because they are not formulated for dog consumption. So, what should you do?

What to Give a Dog for Pain?

can you give a dog advilPain in your pet dog is one of the most upsetting experiences any dog owner can have. You simply want to reach into your medicine cabinet and give your pet dog a capsule of acetaminophen, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid, or even aspirin. Unfortunately, these medications are not formulated for your dog. Their therapeutic strengths are in no way similar to the dose required for dogs. Considering that human pharmaceutical products rely heavily on body weight, your body weight is strikingly different from the body weight of your dog. For example, you may weigh 100 kilograms while your dog will only be weighing about one-tenth of your weight. Obviously you will say that you can just divide your human medication into 10 and give your dog 1/10 of that. Unfortunately, it is not as simple as that.
All substances are processed by the liver. This includes drugs, food, liquids, and almost every other substance that goes inside the body. It is the liver’s responsibility to process these substances so that they will not bring harm to the rest of the body. If you are going to give one-tenth of your human medication, the whole amount may still be toxic to your dog.
Human non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen have been shown to produce vomiting, bloody diarrhea, loss of appetite, intestinal problems, and bleeding disorders among dogs. This is in addition to the more serious liver or kidney failure which can result in death if not managed properly. Acetaminophen has been shown to convert hemoglobin into methemoglobin which can lead to systemic tissue destruction. Of course, not all dogs will be susceptible to these medications.

list of dog pain medicationsHowever, as a responsible dog owner, would you rather risk it?So, the question now is what can you give your dog for pain?
The first thing you need to do is to bring your dog to the veterinarian who will perform a very thorough and comprehensive physical examination of your dog. Laboratory tests can also be performed to rule any ongoing infections or diseases processes. You should understand that pain is not a disease but rather a manifestation of something wrong inside the body. It is your veterinarian’s job to determine the exact cause of the pain on your dog. Managing the cause will always result in the elimination of pain. However, your veterinarian also understands the anxiety that you are going through watching your beloved pet agonize in pain. So, your veterinarian might prescribe pain relievers especially designed for dogs. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs such as meloxicam, carprofen, deracoxib, and firocoxib are often indicated because of their effectiveness. However, do understand that like their human counterparts, these medications can be toxic to dogs. It is very important therefore to follow the veterinarian’s instructions particularly related to dosing. For severe pain, your veterinarian might prescribe amantadine, tramadol, or even gabapentin. Your veterinarian might even give a short acting opiate to relieve the pain. However, this should only be done sparingly.

So, your veterinarian might prescribe pain relievers especially designed for dogs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as meloxicam, carprofen, deracoxib, and firocoxib are often indicated because of their effectiveness. However, do understand that like their human counterparts, these medications can be toxic to dogs. It is very important therefore to follow the veterinarian’s instructions particularly related to dosing. For severe pain, your veterinarian might prescribe amantadine, tramadol, or even gabapentin. Your veterinarian might even give a short acting opiate to relieve the pain. However, this should only be done sparingly.

what can dogs take for painLaboratory tests can also be performed to rule any ongoing infections or diseases processes. You should understand that pain is not a disease but rather a manifestation of something wrong inside the body. It is your veterinarian’s job to determine the exact cause of the pain on your dog. Managing the cause will always result in the elimination of pain. However, your veterinarian also understands the anxiety that you are going through watching your beloved pet agonize in pain. So, your veterinarian might prescribe pain relievers especially designed for dogs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as meloxicam, carprofen, deracoxib, and firocoxib are often indicated because of their effectiveness. However, do understand that like their human counterparts, these medications can be toxic to dogs. It is very important therefore to follow the veterinarian’s instructions particularly related to dosing. For severe pain, your veterinarian might prescribe amantadine, tramadol, or even gabapentin. Your veterinarian might even give a short acting opiate to relieve the pain. However, this should only be done sparingly.

The first thing you need to do is to bring your dog to the veterinarian who will perform a very thorough and comprehensive physical examination of your dog. Laboratory tests can also be performed to rule any ongoing infections or diseases processes. You should understand that pain is not a disease but rather a manifestation of something wrong inside the body. It is your veterinarian’s job to determine the exact cause of the pain on your dog. Managing the cause will always result in the elimination of pain. However, your veterinarian also understands the anxiety that you are going through watching your beloved pet agonize in pain. So, your veterinarian might prescribe pain relievers especially designed for dogs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as meloxicam, carprofen, deracoxib, and firocoxib are often indicated because of their effectiveness. However, do understand that like their human counterparts, these medications can be toxic to dogs. It is very important therefore to follow the veterinarian’s instructions particularly related to dosing. For severe pain, your veterinarian might prescribe amantadine, tramadol, or even gabapentin. Your veterinarian might even give a short acting opiate to relieve the pain. However, this should only be done sparingly.
It is very important to follow your veterinarian’s instructions when giving your dog these medications.
In addition to pain medications, you may also need to check if dietary modifications will work especially if your dog is diagnosed to have arthritis. Furthermore, check if your dog is overweight or obese because this can amplify the pain experience through inflammation. Depending on the diagnosis of your veterinarian as to the exact cause of your dog’s pain, you can have your dog undergo physical therapy, cold laser treatments, and acupuncture. This is why it is very important to bring your dog to his veterinarian.

Dog Arthritis Symptoms

treatment for dogs with arthritisOne of the most common reasons for chronic pain in dogs is arthritis. Just like arthritis in humans, the disease condition occurs when the joints get inflamed because of a variety of factors. The most common cause of arthritis is aging. As dogs age, similar to humans, the cartilaginous surface of the bone gets eroded, become dry and rough, before eventually chipping away to expose the inner layer of the bone. In fact, 1 out of 5 dogs beyond 7 years of age will have arthritis. This results in a very rough movement of the joints.
Additionally, in an attempt to repair the damaged cartilage, the immune system sends out its fleet of cells to help repair the tissue. Unfortunately, the classic response to tissue injury is inflammation whereby immune system cells release chemicals that are designed to increase blood flow to the damaged area in an effort to sequester all reparative cells at the site of the injury. This results in inflammation further reducing joint mobility and limiting the range of motion of the joints. The combined reparative, inflammatory, and degenerative processes account for the pain experienced by your dog who has arthritis, typically similar to that of human arthritis.
So, aside from pain, what are the symptoms of dog arthritis?
• Limping
• Difficulty rising
• Loss of interest to walk or even to play
• Snaps when petted
• Difficulty climbing stairs
All of these symptoms are related to the inflammation of the joints. Because joint mobility is severely restricted, the major symptom that you can expect to see from your dog will be problems in mobility.

Signs of Pain in Dogs

dog arthritis home remedyIt is often said that pain is a very subjective, very individual, experience. No two individuals will have the same exact type and level of pain despite objective pain assessment tools. Among dogs, the evaluation of pain gets even more difficult because they cannot verbalize what they are going through. It thus becomes very important to become knowledgeable about the different signs of pain in dogs.
• Excessive vocalizations such as whining yelping, snarling, whimpering, howling, or even growling may be telltale signs that your dog is in pain especially when there are no clear indications that he should be vocalizing this excessively. Unfortunately, many dog owners dismiss this behavior as simply being a part of being a dog.

• Constant localized grooming is almost always a clear indication that your dog is trying to soothe that body part with its saliva. More akin to rubbing a sting on your skin, dogs attempt to rub the surface of their skin or coat in an attempt to get rid of the pain.

• If your dog has been panting excessively even if he is well-rested, there is a strong likelihood that your dog is in pain. Shallow and fast breathing are often indications of an abdominal discomfort. The breathing needs to be shallow in order not to exert undue pressure on the abdominal cavity where it hurts.

• Changes in daily habits such as feeding, resting, drinking, or even sleeping. Sick dogs will often lie around the whole day refusing to play or engage in his daily activities. They will often not want to eat even if you are going to give them their favorite treats. These are often signs that your dog is in pain.

• Sudden unexplained aggression or any change in the normal behavior of your dog is always a sign that there is a problem. Dogs that are known to be social and docile that suddenly becomes aggressive are simply guarding their painful body part. It is their way of telling you not to touch them because it hurts.

How to Tell if a Dog is in Pain

natural remedies for arthritis in dogsIn addition to the ones mentioned above, it is always a safe bet that any sudden change in your dog’s behavior, daily routines, or even temperament will often spell trouble. When it comes to health problems, pain is something that even animals can be cranky about. So changes in your dog’s gait, lack of energy, loss of appetite, bloodshot eyes and constricted or dilated pupils, sudden aggressiveness, fast and shallow breathing, changes in your dog’s posture, and excessive panting are all indications that your beloved pet is in pain.
Heed these signs and symptoms well and bring your dog to his veterinarian. The exact cause of his pain must be determined while at the same time, your veterinarian can give your dog some medications for his pain.